International Day of Education 2024: Interview with Ruth Adeyemi

Ruth Adeyemi

If there is anyone who embodies the vision of revolutionizing the health sector in Nigeria, it has to be Ruth Adeyemi. She is the poster girl for consistency, resilience, hard work, excellence and purpose. In this interview, Ruth Adeyemi lets us in on her journey and celebrates International day of Education by encouraging young people like herself to pursue their vision relentlessly.

I believe God places his children in every single sector as proof that they are His children and made in His image. God has His people in every profession to show forth His glory and excellence. When God is judging the earth, He will hold everyone accountable for their giftings and calling.

Hello Ruth, can we get to know you?

My name is Ruth Adeyemi.  I am a PharmD/MPH candidate committed to Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP) standards, providing quality and compassionate care for medically underserved populations, and advocating for interprofessional collaboration among healthcare providers.

Having witnessed the negative impact of inadequate pharmacy practices, I actively collaborate with healthcare professionals to establish patient-centred pharmacy practices focusing on minorities and underserved communities.

I envision a lasting impact on healthcare accessibility and actively advocate for a Nigerian pharmacy practice system that reflects principles of empathy and excellence.

What’s your education story?

I was privileged to attend private primary and secondary schools and I attained excellent results. Initially, I applied to the University of Benin for Pharmacy because I had really good results, however, I was given a different course and I simply refused to do it because I knew what I wanted. I chose to wait another year and apply again.

Miraculously, my Uncle had a great relationship with the Secretary General of PTDF and that got me a scholarship to study in the United States of America. I didn’t necessarily have a say in the choice of university, it was chosen for me. I experienced culture shock upon relocating. Everything was different and my background in Nigeria helped me thrive at the university. I always asked questions, no one should be ashamed of asking questions.

At first, I struggled with biochemistry and organic chemistry. I remember getting a D in my first biochemistry assessment but I was not fazed and decided to work harder. The rigorousness of the Nigerian system set me up for success over here.

As a little girl did you ever dream of doing all you are doing now?

No. I am from a loving family and I was provided for. I was very comfortable in the space I was in. There was no reason to dream about anything. However, it changed when I left the country for my university education. When I travelled outside the country, I realized that the little bubble I was in, was not enough. I was exposed to so many possibilities. This opened my mind to dream big and have big goals.  Informal education, exposure, and networking opened up my mind.

Dear parents, please support your girl children. If my mother didn’t support me, I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing now. When I finished my undergraduate program, so many people told my mother that it is time for me to get married, but my mother insisted on allowing me follow my dreams. She has been so supportive and that has been my strength on this journey.

Do you believe in mentorship? Do you have people that you look up to?

Your potential mentor could be someone that you are close to. Barrister Timipre Wolo was my first-ever mentor and she played an integral role in me getting to pharmacy school. At pharmacy school, I met someone who has now become my pharmacy mentor who is an African American. We lean on the shoulders of those who have gone ahead. Mentorship will do a lot for you. I always give back to my mentors – I always ask them what I can do for them. Mentorship has taken me to places that I wouldn’t have reached otherwise.

Also, in building relationships and connecting with mentors, find people who share the same values as you. It is important to identify your values and find mentors that align with such values. Furthermore, try to ensure that your “mentors” are reachable and not unreachable. Always keep in touch with your mentors, try and to maintain the relationship. They are most likely busy people and you must do all you can to maintain the relationship. Whenever they need help with anything, volunteer to help them.

Can you tell us more about SARMLife and The Compassionate Pharmacy Practice Project (TCPPP)?

I own a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Agency business, SARMLife, with a proven track record of driving organic traffic, enhancing search visibility, and boosting conversions. Also, I work with influencers and business owners to boost visibility which leads to increased website traffic, increased brand awareness and increased brand partnership deals. SARMLife started in 2019 after my degree.

SARMLife’s purpose held me down during the two years of waiting on God before Pharmacy School. Before leaving Nigeria, God told me SARMLife would fund my education in the USA, it did not make much sense, but last year, I saw what He said come to pass. SARMLife has been a blessing from God.

The Compassionate Pharmacy Practice Project is building the next generation of Pharmacists in Nigeria who follow Good Pharmacy Practice standards. The International Federation of Pharmacists set these standards to guide the practice of pharmacy in different countries.

As the Pioneer of The Compassionate Pharmacy Practice Project (TCPPP), myself and my team organize webinars to empower Nigerian pharmacy students nationally and train them to be GPP stewards and compassionate pharmacists.

In addition, TCPPP organizes pharmacy-related essay writing contests, Medical/SEO writing training for pharmacy advocacy purposes, pharmacy-based research to identify loopholes in the Nigerian pharmacy practice system and more initiatives.

What are your thoughts on girl child education? What would you say to any young African girl to encourage her or her parents to acquire an education?

I come from one of the most rural places in Nigeria. It is a very small village and everyone knows everyone over there. Before university, I hadn’t travelled anywhere outside that community. However, I must thank my mother for always enrolling me in private schools and reminding my siblings and me about the need to get educated.

It does not matter your background, as long as you envision becoming something, you can be that. It always starts with formal education. If you can, leave your surroundings, it exposes you to a lot and expands your mind. With the right education, you can be whatever you want to become. You will have access to opportunities, so long as you don’t limit yourself – don’t be afraid to take up opportunities.

Dear parents, please support your grandchildren. If my mother didn’t support me, I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing now. When I finished my undergraduate program, so many people told my mother that it was time for me to get married. However, my mother insisted on allowing me to follow my dreams. She has been so supportive and that has been my strength on this journey.

What do you think about parents who prevent their children or even individuals who stay away from going into certain career paths because they are deemed as “ungodly”?

I believe God places his children in every single sector as proof that they are His children and made in His image. God has His people in every profession to show forth His glory and excellence. When God is judging the earth, He will hold everyone accountable for their giftings and calling.

Do you have any counsel for young people who have parents insisting on a certain career pathway and God has told them something else?

In every decision, we must honour our parents. The Bible also says that the heart of Kings is in the hand of God. Just commit this into serious prayers and let God do His thing. He can change their minds and make a way.

However, in situations where your next level is tied to whatever your parents may be resisting, you may have to make drastic decisions. Prayerfully and honourably make your decisions.

What if the said person is not a Christian?

I would say that you are of age, you are no longer a minor. You can most definitely stand on your own and make your decision. Eventually, when you are successful, your parents will come around. However, you can always go about this respectfully. The process may not be easy, and you have to mentally prepare for that.

Thank you so much for your time Ruth. I trust your story will inspire young people like us around the continent. Wishing you the very best with all that you do!

You can find Ruth Adeyemi here

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7 Responses
  1. Uju

    Thank you, Ruth, for sharing your story, you’ve always been an inspiration to me❤️❤️

    Mother’s love is unparalleled. God bless her.

  2. Jewel

    This is so beautiful to read.Your story is always inspiring Pharm. Ruth. Well done to your mum for supporting you and your dreams. Keep soaring and being an inspiration to many. ❤️❤️

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